Tuesday, July 22, 2014

And then There Were None (1945)

René Clair's 1945 film adaptation of Agatha Christie's best-selling mystery


Eight people, all total strangers to each other, are invited to small, isolated Indian Island off the coast of England, by Mr. and Mrs. Owen. They settle in at a mansion tended by two newly hired servants, Thomas and Ethel Rogers, but their hosts are absent. When the guests sit down to dinner, they notice the centerpiece, ten figurines of Indians in a circle. Afterward, Thomas puts on a gramophone record, from which a voice accuses them all of murder:
  • General Sir John Mandrake (played by C. Aubrey Smith), of ordering his wife's lover, a lieutenant, to his death
  • Emily Brent (Judith Anderson), of the death of her young nephew
  • Dr. Edward G. Armstrong (Walter Huston), of drunkenness which resulted in a patient dying
  • Prince Nikita Starloff (Mischa Auer), of killing a couple
  • Vera Claythorne (June Duprez), of murdering her sister's fiance
  • Judge Francis J. Quinncannon (Barry Fitzgerald), of being responsible for the hanging of an innocent man (Edward Seton, guilty, in the novel)
  • Philip Lombard (Louis Hayward), of killing 21 East African tribesmen
  • William H. Blore (Roland Young), of perjury, resulting in an innocent man's death
  • Thomas (Richard Haydn) and Ethel Rogers (Queenie Leonard), of the demise of their previous employer, an invalid.
It turns out that none of the ten knows or has even seen "U. N. Owen," as he signed his instructions to Thomas; they suddenly realize it stands for "unknown." The guests decide to leave, but Thomas informs them that the boat will not return until Monday, and it is only Friday.

Remakes
as Ten Little Indians (1965), Ten Little Indians (1974), Desyat Negrityat (1987)
 and Ten Little Indians (1989)

Monday, July 21, 2014

2014 USA Fiction Challenge: Kentucky

The next stop on the 2014 USA Fiction Challenge is the state of Kentucky.

Presenting
Uncle Tom's Cabin
by

 






Margarita Fischer - Eliza
James B. Lowe - Uncle Tom
Arthur Edmund Carewe - George Harris
George Siegmann - Simon Legree
Eulalie Jensen - Cassie
Mona Ray - Topsy
Virginia Grey - Eva St. Clare
Lassie Lou Ahern - Little Harry
Lucien Littlefield - Lawyer Marks
Jack Mower - Mr. Shelby
Vivien Oakland - Mrs. Shelby

Avery Brooks as Uncle Tom
 Phylicia Rashad as Eliza
 Edward Woodward as Simon Legree
,Jenny Lewis as Evangeline 'Little Eva' St. Claire
Samuel L. Jackson as George
Endyia Kinney as Topsy 
Kate Burton as Ophelia
Augustine St. Claire
Mr. Shelby
Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896)

First appeared as a 40-week serial in The National Era
an abolitionist periodical, starting on June 5, 1851

Six full-page illustrations by Hammatt Billings engraved for the first printing. 
Published in book form on March 20, 1852

Sunday, July 20, 2014

The Rockford Files (1974-1980)

James Garner (1928-2014) portrays Los Angeles-based private investigator Jim Rockford


In the 1970s, Roy Huggins had an idea to remake Maverick, but this time as a modern-day private detective. Huggins teamed with co-creator Stephen J. Cannell, and the pair tapped Garner to attempt to rekindle the success of Maverick, eventually recycling many of the plots from the original series. Starting with the 1974 season, Garner appeared as private investigator Jim Rockford in The Rockford Files. He appeared for six seasons, for which he received an Emmy Award for Best Actor in 1977.

In Remembrance Of
James Scott Bumgarner (April 7, 1928 to July 19, 2014)

Saturday, July 19, 2014

Day of the Dolls #7

Today is the final day of Day of the Dolls. All this week I have highlighted each day one or two noir titles from the late 1940's to the early 1960's. 

Presenting
Dead Dolls Don't Talk
by Day Keene

He figured her for just another one night stand...until he found her still there in the morning - murdered.


A juror who learns the hard way what it means to find yourself on the wrong side of the law. Hours after returning a verdict of “guilty” in a murder case, Doc Hart wakes up next to the condemned man’s wife…dead wife. On the run and wanted for murder, Hart’s only friend is Gerta, the young woman from his shop whose affections he turned down in the past. Together, the two of them head to Mexico to unravel an increasingly complicated scheme that looks harder and harder to prove.


Printing History
Written by Gunnar Hjerstedt, (1904-1969)

Crest Books
1959 

Stark House Press
2011

Friday, July 18, 2014

Day of the Dolls #6

Today we are almost done with the Day of the Dolls. All this week I have been showcasing a mystery title or two with Doll in the title. Why do you ask? Dolls. All through the late forties to the early sixties a doll would be associated with a hardboiled or noir title. Today is a special treat. Not one but two Dolls with the same title. 

Presenting

Death of a Doll
by Hilda Lawrence


Miss Small and Miss Brady do everything to make their boarders feel safe and secure: Hope House is one of the few places in new York City where a young working woman could enjoy a homey atmosphere at very little cost. When Ruth Miller moves in, however, the atmosphere seems to change, and when her body is found in the courtyard, the miasma engulfing Hope House becomes stifling. suddenly no one in Hope House is quite what she seems, and no one is above suspicion . . .

Printing History
Written by Hildegarde Kronmiller (1906-1976)

Simon & Schuster
April 1947
Death of a Doll
by Carter Brown

A private eye accepts a movie mogul's bid to track down a wandering wanton star in Florida. Her name was Gloria Van Raven and she preferred to party on a yacht of Edward Woolrich II. Until the party got too wild with a dixieland horn player sounding a lament in a polka dotted bikini lying dead at his feet.

 This title was originally posted in December 2010 in a slightly different form
Death of a Doll

And Featured during the 2013 Crime Fiction Alphabet
 The Letter E

Printing History
Written by Alan G Yates (1923-1985)

Horwitz Publications, Inc
 Numbered Series #11 1956
Second Collectors' Series  Vol 1 #20 October 1958
Reprint By Demand Series #22 July 1960
Long Story Magazine #21 April 1961
International Edition November 1962 (IE21) 1971 (IE70)

Note
This title was revised as The Ever-Loving Blues in 1961 for the USA market

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Day of the Dolls #5

Today we are on the other side of the half way point of the Day of the Dolls. All this week I will be showcasing a mystery title or two with Doll in the title. Why do you ask? Dolls. All through the late forties to the early sixties a doll would be associated with a hardboiled or noir title.

Presenting

Death For A Doll
by Spike Morreli


Printing History
Written by William Newton (1923- )

The Leisure Library
#2 (1952)

Tough Doll
by Peggy Gaddis
 

 Printing History
Written by Erolie Pearl Gaddis Dern (1895-1966)

Venus Books
#131 (1951)

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Day of the Dolls #4

Today we are at the half way point of the Day of the Dolls. All this week I will be showcasing a mystery title or two with Doll in the title. Why do you ask? Dolls. All through the late forties to the early sixties a doll would be associated with a hardboiled or noir title.

Presenting

Doll For The Big House
by Carter Brown

She was a living doll.....
It was going to take
a grand a day
to keep her that way.
A grand, and a Grand Jury!


A routine Missing Persons case, the captain snarled as he flung the brief in Al Wheeler's face. Sure it was routine, just several dolls making like a harem in some guy's big house. And we that guy turned out to be some king of the racketeers. And Al got flung out of the force on a sex maniac charge, that was routine too. Like a Jane Mansfield Marilyn Monroe hip wiggling contest. And so they decided to convene a Grand Jury, but whose fault was it that the chief witness turned up as a corpse in Wheeler's apartment. Al could see the pellets dropping into the tank and the gas vapors rising, but that's routine, it happens everyday in Sing Sing.

Printing History
Written by Alan G Yates (1923-1985)

Horwitz Publications, Inc
Numbered Series #46
August 1957

Note
Revised as

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Day of the Dolls #3

Today is the third day of the Day of the Dolls. All this week I will be showcasing a mystery title or two with Doll in the title. Why do you ask? Dolls. All through the late forties to the early sixties a doll would be associated with a hardboiled or noir title. 

Introducing
Dolls and Dues
by Orrie Hitt

Cover by Walter Popp

Printing History
Written by Orrie Hitt

Beacon Books
BB151
1957

Bonus

 Campus Doll
by Edwin West

Cover by Tom Miller
 Printing History
Written by Donald E. Westlake (1933-2008)

Monarch Books
1961

Monday, July 14, 2014

Day Of The Dolls #2

Today is the second day of the Day of the Dolls. All this week I will be showcasing a mystery title or two with Doll in the title. Why do you ask? Dolls. All through the late forties to the early sixties a doll would be associated with a hardboiled or noir title.

Introducing

Danger Doll And Paper Doll
by Carl Dekker

"One the spot" mystery
Cover by Stan Pitt

Cover by Stan Pitt
 Printing History
Written by John Laffin (1922-2000)

Calvert Publishing Company
Mid 1950s

Sunday, July 13, 2014

Day Of The Dolls #1

Today kicks off the Day of the Dolls. All this week I will be showcasing a mystery title or two with Doll in the title. Why do you ask? Dolls. All through the late forties to the early sixties a doll would be associated with a hardboiled or noir title.

Introducing

Day of the Dolls

Dead Dolls Don't Cry (1953)
by Carter Brown



Printing History
Written by Alan G Yates (1923-1985)

Transport Publishing Company
for and on behalf of Horwitz Publications, Inc

Novelette Series
"Lovely" Mystery
1953

First Collectors' Series
w/Widow Is Willing & Blackmail For A Brunette 
No.9
1955

Death House Doll (1953)
by Day Keene



Printing History
Written by Gunnar Hjerstedt, (1904-1969)

Ace
D-41 
w/Mourning After by Thomas B Dewey
January 1953 

Prologue Books
November 2012